Grilled Potato Bombs

This past weekend I made potato bombs for the first time. I was inspired by the BBQ Pit Boys’ video on YouTube and thought I’d give it a shot. Since this was my first attempt, I decided to go simple. Here’s what I did.

1. The first thing I did was core out the center of 6 giant Russet potatoes. I tried to get the roundest potatoes available since I figured the longer variations would be too hard to core. I searched every local retailer in vain for an apple corer and had to settle on using a long, thin knife. (Note: I will never do that again.) Whatever you choose to use, your potatoes should look something like this.

A cored out Russet potato. Be sure to keep the core.

2. I chose some very simple ingredients to fill my potatoes with. I was more interested in trying out the technique than I was in trying to be super creative.

Selecting what to stuff your potatoes with is the hardest part of the process.

I elected to make two different kinds: 1.) Canadian bacon, green pepper, onion, and cheddar cheese; and 2.) Oven-roasted turkey breast, green pepper, onion, and cheddar cheese. Selecting the fillings is actually the toughest part of the whole process, simply because the varieties are endless. But once you pick them out you simply stuff as much as you can into the potato and plug the ends with the tips of the core.

3. Once the potatoes were all stuffed and plugged, I wrapped each one with two strips of bacon.

How could anything wrapped in bacon go wrong?

Next I wrapped each of them in foil. I was careful to fold the foil differently for each kind so I could tell what was what. Thinking ahead = good.

Make sure you know which is which before you start to cook them.

4. I grilled the potato bombs using the smoke box of my Smoke Hollow 47180T. I grilled them between 380-415 degrees for about an hour or so, turning them once halfway through. In the BBQ Pit Boys’ video the bacon came out crispy. Mine, however, was not. So to crisp it up I unwrapped a few potato bombs and placed them over the coals to finish them off.

Yes, that is cheddar cheese you see oozing out the end. Mmm...

5. The final product turned out very nice. The potatoes were done all the way through, and all the ingredients stuffed inside were cooked perfectly. I ended up cutting one in half lengthwise and covering one half with Ranch dressing and the other half with some Sweet Baby Ray’s. My wife went the sour cream route. Both of us were stuffed after eating one potato and a side salad each.

The final product with some Ranch dressing.

So there you have my first attempt at potato bombs. I have all sorts of ideas for other kinds to make, but I’m interested in what you might come up with. Leave a comment with your own creative ideas of what would taste good inside.

12 thoughts on “Grilled Potato Bombs

  1. Do the same, but add real bacon bit pieces inside instead of wrapping potato. I had same problem as you and found stuffing potato with real bacon bit pieces adds a smokie flavor thru out potato. Instead of wrapping in bacon I coat with olive oil and season outside of potato with salt and pepper.

  2. I DID IT WITH A SWEET POTATOES. STUFFED THEM WITH BROWN SUGAR(LIGHT) SWEET BUTTER AND CINNAMON. WRAPPED I FOIL AND BAKED AT 400 ON BG GREEN EGG FOR ABOUT AN HOUR . IT IS NOW A FAVORITE. SIMPLICITY IS THE BIG THING AND NO MORE STICKY PANS TO CLEAN. I DO PREFER SWEET BUTTER. IF YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS PLEASE SHARE,

  3. I’ll be trying this tomorrow. Thanks for the ideas on stuffings. If you have any other combinations since posting this please update the comments for us or the post itself as a new paragraph.

    My new grill has a crank for lowering raising coals—been waiting for a long time for the functionality and a front door to access to the coals throughout the process.

  4. We have been making these for a while and found that cutting all of the stuffing ingredients up into little pieces, mixing them together, and then stuffing them into the potatoes turns out way yummier. Our favorite stuffing mixture so far is sausage, ham, shredded cheddar, garlic, salt, pepper, and bbq sauce. We also make a larger hole throught the potato by coring it twice, overlapping the holes to make an oval with the apple corer. The actual core pieces are too long so I use the ends to plug up the potatoes and cut up the rest of the cores and fry them up for breakfast the next day. These are always a hit at BBQ pot lucks that our families have.

  5. Are the filler ingredients uncooked, I.e. any vegetables? If so, do they actually cook-up alongv with the potato? How about some of the meat choices suggested, I.e. Canadian bacon, sausage? I assume meats are already cooked?

    • Beth, the veggies cook up inside the potatoes, but it wouldn’t hurt to sauté them first if you wanted. Canadian ham or diced ham come precooked, but sausage should be browned before going in. Sadly, I have only ever done potato bombs 1 time, so I am no official on it.

  6. My Italian friend told this was a popular dish in her family and mentioned they used a wine corkscrew before using the aplple corer, to make it easier to create the hollow in the potatoes.

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